Managing Your Digital Stuff - Legal
http://edu-observatory.org/olli/Manage/Legal.html




What Happens to Your Digital Assets When You Die?
  https://www.legalzoom.com/articles/what-happens-to-your-digital-assets-when-you-die   

  Increasingly, we are spending a lot more time online,
  whether for business, personal, social, and/or entertainment
  reasons-usually it's some combination of all of these.
  Depending on your situation, you may have vast digital
  content, mementos, communications, etc. These are assets
  that would be in tangible form if not for technological
  advancements.
  
  What happens when we die with these digital assets? Estate
  and inheritance laws still haven't caught up to the growing
  number of digital assets, but there are some things you can
  do to incorporate these items into your estate plan.


Why You Must Put Digital Assets in Your Will or Estate Plan
  https://www.aarp.org/home-family/personal-technology/info-2021/remember-digital-assets-in-your-will.html   

  You may not realize it, but you're creating a significant
  digital footprint as you send email, comment on social
  media, post a photo gallery and view your medical records
  electronically - and that's even if you don't have a blog,
  podcast or website.

  But what happens to all these assets after you die? Creating
  a digital estate plan is becoming increasingly important,
  whether it's handled through your will or your estate's
  lawyers, services that specialize in assigning digital
  beneficiaries, or a complete list of your online accounts
  and their passwords given to a trusted family member or
  friend.





Your digital life after death https://ideas.ted.com/your-digital-life-after-death/ What about meeting loved ones face to face? The Hereafter Institute offers virtual reality reconstructions, based on photographs and videos, that let family members greet deceased loved ones reconstructed as 3D characters, and hear audio recordings of people recounting memories of them. "I wanted it to be very much an experience of stepping into a memory," says Barcia-Colombo. Once he's created a 3D model of the deceased, he asks their family to offer a memory of that person, from which he creates a virtual scene. "You enter a waiting room and see a door with names of people around it. Staring at a name selects it, and the door opens. Your deceased loved one is on the other side of the doorway, and you end up in a scene with that person for a brief moment," he describes. sam.wormley@gmail.com